"…A white graduate of a public Michigan university who wishes to pass his historical privilege on to his children may freely lobby the board of that university in favor of an expanded legacy admissions policy, whereas a black Michigander who was denied the opportunity to attend that very university cannot lobby the board in favor of a policy that might give his children a chance that he never had and that they might never have absent that policy."

— Supreme Court Justice, Sonia Sotomayor, in her dissent following the Supreme Court decision to uphold the Michigan Ban on Affirmative Action in public universities (http://www.supremecourt.gov/opinions/13pdf/12-682_j4ek.pdf)

(Source: justjachele, via wretchedoftheearth)

"I want you to remember who you are, despite the bad things that are happening to you. Because those bad things aren’t you. They are just things that happen to you. You need to accept that who you are and the things that happen you, are not one and the same."

— Colleen Hoover, Hopeless (via kittymudface)

(via feminist-ink)

"Race matters. Race matters in part because of the long history of racial minorities’ being denied access to the political process. See Part I, supra; see also South Carolina v. Katzenbach, 383 U.S. 301, 309 (1966) (describing racial discrimination in voting as an insidious evil which had been perpetuated in certain parts of our country through unremitting and ingenious defiance of the Constitution”). And although we have made great strides ‘voting discrimination still exists; no one doubts that.”

Race also matters because of persistent racial inequality in society - inequality that cannot be ignored and that has produced stark socioeconomic disparities.

See Gratz, 539 U.S., at 298-300 (Ginsburg, J., dissenting) cataloging the many ways in which “the effects of centuries of law-sanctioned inequality remain painfully evident in our communities and schools,” in areas like employment, poverty, access to health care, housing, consumer transactions, and education; Adarand, 515 U.S., at 273 (Ginsburg, J. dissenting) recognizing that the “lingering effects” of discrimination “reflective of a system of racial caste only recently ended, are evident in our workplaces, markets, and neighborhoods.”

And race matters for reasons that really are only skin deep, that cannot be discussed any other way, and that cannot be wished away. Race matters to a young man’s view of society when he spends his teenage years watching others tense up as he passes, no matter the neighborhood where he grew up.

Race matters to a young woman’s sense of self when she states her hometown, and then is pressed, “No, where are you really from?” regardless of how many generations her family has been in the country.

Race matters to a young person addressed by a stranger in a foreign language, which he does not understand because only English was spoken at home.

Race matters because of the slights, the snickers, the silent judgments that reinforce that most crippling of thoughts: “I do not belong here.”"

— Sonia Sotomayor in her dissent in Schuette v. Coalition to Defend Affirmative Action. It’s worth a read. (via wretchedoftheearth)

impactings:

today my professor told me
every cell in our entire body
is destroyed and replaced
every seven years.

how comforting it is to know
one day i will have a body
you will have never touched.

(via beckainthesky)

petertchaikowsky:

nicolejanelle:

This is one of my favorite little comics on here.

Wow, this is exactly how I feel about life.

(Source: leseanthomas, via tessmunster)

hintz-magazine:

A reminder to not be so harsh on yourself
1. You are good; you are not a terrible person. Just remember that. You feel bad about what you’ve done, what ever it was. And that’s ok, that’s more than ok, that shows how much you care, how sorry you are, how you are willing to make things better.
2. You are smart; we all make mistakes, we blurted out hurtful words or didn’t thought before we act. We make mistakes in school, at work, with our family, with our friends, with ourselves. That doesn’t make you stupid, or less worthy. You know what that makes you? It doesn’t matter, because a mistake doesn’t define you. In any way. And you have a brain, and you can learn, and you can start again, because yeah, you are smart and you can do that.
3. You are person;and it’s ok to consider every aspect of it. Your emotions, your thoughts, your fears, your strengths and weaknesses. Because you’re not just a brain, or just emotion, you are whole person. And it’s ok to doubt, and to trust.
4. It’s never too late to say i’m sorry;it always counts. Maybe that person won’t understand it at that moment, but you know you mean it, and that’s important, it’s good to let them, and yourself, hear that. 
5. Time is important;not only to heal, but to use it properly. Use it to learn from your mistakes, not to cry over them over and over again. Use it to feel good with yourself again, and to make other people happy. 
5. You don’t have to punish yourself;it’s ok to be sad, it’s ok to cry and feel angry. But don’t hate yourself, hate is already bad when is towards other person and it’s even worst when is towards yourself. As I said, mistakes doesn’t define you, and you can make it better.
Please. Don’t give up on yourself.
I’ve done some pretty horrible things too, to people who I really love. And I tend to blame them instead of recognizing my own mistakes. Just always remember that after a good cry we can think with clarity again, and you are not bad, you’re just gonna be better now.
xo, Jimena.

hintz-magazine:

A reminder to not be so harsh on yourself

1. You are good; you are not a terrible person. Just remember that. You feel bad about what you’ve done, what ever it was. And that’s ok, that’s more than ok, that shows how much you care, how sorry you are, how you are willing to make things better.

2. You are smart; we all make mistakes, we blurted out hurtful words or didn’t thought before we act. We make mistakes in school, at work, with our family, with our friends, with ourselves. That doesn’t make you stupid, or less worthy. You know what that makes you? It doesn’t matter, because a mistake doesn’t define you. In any way. And you have a brain, and you can learn, and you can start again, because yeah, you are smart and you can do that.

3. You are person;and it’s ok to consider every aspect of it. Your emotions, your thoughts, your fears, your strengths and weaknesses. Because you’re not just a brain, or just emotion, you are whole person. And it’s ok to doubt, and to trust.

4. It’s never too late to say i’m sorry;it always counts. Maybe that person won’t understand it at that moment, but you know you mean it, and that’s important, it’s good to let them, and yourself, hear that. 

5. Time is important;not only to heal, but to use it properly. Use it to learn from your mistakes, not to cry over them over and over again. Use it to feel good with yourself again, and to make other people happy. 

5. You don’t have to punish yourself;it’s ok to be sad, it’s ok to cry and feel angry. But don’t hate yourself, hate is already bad when is towards other person and it’s even worst when is towards yourself. As I said, mistakes doesn’t define you, and you can make it better.

Please. Don’t give up on yourself.

I’ve done some pretty horrible things too, to people who I really love. And I tend to blame them instead of recognizing my own mistakes. Just always remember that after a good cry we can think with clarity again, and you are not bad, you’re just gonna be better now.

xo, Jimena.

(via positiveconnotation)

fatbodypolitics:

Mary Lambert - Body Love

(via feminist-ink)

notcisjustwoman:

hellomissmayhem:

tehbewilderness:

kecrambles:

heterophobicgoat:

stupidandreckless:

NOOOO NO NO NONO FUCK FUCK  FUCKIG CBS IS TELLING WOMEN NOT TO REPORT SEXUAL HARASSMENT BECAUSE IT WILL “DAMAGE THEIR CAREERS” and “HARASSMENT IS AN UNFORTUNATE PART OF CLIMBING THE LADDER” I AM SO ANGRY THEY ARE LITERALLY TURNING SEXUAL HARASSMENT INTO A NORM THIS IS NOT OKAY

This is an actual article and I’m still having a hard time believing it’s real.

are you even fucking kidding me, this is so unbelievable that i thought it was going to be a parody at first

It is absolutely chilling to live in a society where the corporate media declares sexual harassment of women by men to be the norm and politicians declare the rape of women to be mens nature.

The creepy d00dz are still in charge of the world, eh? Maybe we should do something about that?

There has got to be someone to email about this.

Every woman who works for CBS has been subjected to sexual harassment just by CBS publishing this article. They are clearly trying to create a working environment where their female employees are told, in no uncertain terms, that they should not report harassment. That’s illegal.

(via beckainthesky)

edgebug:

sincerely, a person who has been on prozac for 9 years

this is in response to some shitty stuff i’ve seen on my dash recently. it’s super simplified, so if you’d like to know some more indepth stuff on how exactly it works, google it—OR BETTER YET actually talk to a mental health doctor psychiatrist person wow

(via thatfeministqueer)

yourmediahasproblems:

littlemissrantsalot:

yourmediahasproblems:

i want to create a tv show about a group of friends where they’re all queer except the one token cishet friend who’s only there to say stereotypical “straight” things for laughs like “macklemore got me into rap” and “my mom and i got into a fight because she wouldn’t buy me a fourth obey snapback”

Or we could just stop stereotyping people.

you’re cast

(via thatfeministqueer)

smashsurvey:

Now think of how many of those female characters and protagonists are oversexed, created for the male gaze, or put in an inactive damsel role for the plot of the game. Representation matters. A Study last year proved that exposure to tv shows increased the self esteem of young white boys and markedly decreased the confidence and self esteem of girls across the board (and we haven’t even started on the representation of characters of color and the effect it has on children’s self perception). 

Video games are a different media, and even more concerning if representation metrics are changing how our kids think of themselves. Especially knowing that 67% of American Households have video game consoles and 91% of Children play video games regularly,how do you think the portrayal (and lack of portrayals) of women and girls in these games is affecting little girls – or influencing how little boys view their importance and/or influence over them? 

Comics. Movies. Lit. Pop Culture. The Smash Survey is an upcoming podcast project that will critically explore the representation of race, gender, and queer identity in media and pop culture in a fun and engaging format. 

(Source: childrennow.org, via femfreq)

Aspiring Plus Size Model Renee

(Source: planetofthickbeautifulwomen, via curvesandconfidence)